IUVA World Congress 2021

5 things we learned

IUVA WORLD CONGRESS 2021 - 5(6) THINGS WE LEARNED

The International Ultraviolet Association World Congress is a biennial event which attracts leading experts in the field of Ultraviolet Technology from around the Globe and is a great opportunity for networking and sharing knowledge.

Sadly, COVID restrictions meant that this years event had to take place on line though it is a credit to the organisers that they still delivered a high quality programme and maybe having the event on-line was a factor in the record number of attendees from all parts of the world.

The event took place across 7th and 8th June and here are 5(6) points we thought worth sharing:

1.  AN EVER GROWING FOCUS ON UV LED

The IUVA World Congress is a biennial event interspersed by the IUVA Americas conference and other events around the world and a constant across all of those events has been the increasing proportion of presentations on the subject of UV LEDs including a blend of topics from a broad spectrum of professionals:

  • UV LED manufacturers – Progress, Roadmap, etc…
  • System Integrators – from point of use applications and now moving towards point of entry and on to municipal scale applications.
  • Academics – on the characterisation of LEDs themselves but also fundamental research on UV using LEDs as LEDs are much easier than mercury lamps to operate in a lab environment.

2.  MERCURY IN THE UV INDUSTRY

The conference was opened by a Keynote Address from Jennifer Heathcote of GEW who spoke eloquently about the use of Mercury in the UV disinfection industry and how the Minamata convention and the development of UVC LEDs might drive the industry towards a Mercury Free future.

Here is a link to the GEW website where you can view Jennifer's speech.

3.  COVID IMPACT

The pandemic has had a profound impact on the UV industry as it has on all our lives. In the short term the impact has created both challenges and opportunities for businesses depending on how they are structured ans the last year has seen a significant increase in new entrants to the UV world, particularly looking at air and surface disinfection applications. Many of these new entrants are focusing on LED technology and so UV-C LED manufacturers are seeing record volumes of sales and that is having a direct impact on the pace of product development which seems to have boomed in recent months

4.  FAR UVC AND 222NM

Linked to the COVID impact and the desire to use UV light to deal with viruses in the general population one of the hot topics of recent months has been the focus on the development of Excimer lamps emitting UV light at 222nm. UVC light for disinfection is usually used in the 250 to 280nm wavelength where it is effective against bacteria and viruses but is also harmful to humans. It is thought that Far UVC light may not present the same level of risk. While this technology is still in its infancy and both higher efficiency light sources and long-term research on potential human risks are needed before this can seriously enter the market, we should expect to see an increase in focus on this area of research at future events. Particularly if we have to live with COVID for the long term.

5.  AOP PROGRESSION

The increase deployment of Advanced Oxidation Processes. Whilst previous decades (1990-2010) were focusing on academic research, more and more full-scale applications are being implemented, mainly for water reuse with several several case-studies presented at the event.

6.  TYPHON PRESENTATION

We may be a little bit biased but, by far the best presentation over the 2 days was by our own Audrius Židonis who discussed his work in the development of the Worlds First Municipal Scale USEPA Validated UV LED Reactor.

Click here for a link to the Audrius' presentation:

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Topics from this blog: Disinfection UV LED IUVA AOP

Mercury Free UV LED

Download our White Paper which introduces municipal scale UV LED Disinfection

Why Typhon’s UV LED Water Treatment?

An optimally energy-efficient configuration of UV LEDs in a water treatment system, will be first to compete with Hg UV, and will retain its advantage as UV LED performance improves.

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